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Rohingya Crisis Response

Duration: 2019 to 2020
Local Partner: Centre for Disability in Development (CDD)

THE NEED

The displaced Rohingya people in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh remain in an extremely precarious situation despite progress towards meeting their basic and immediate needs. With an uncertain future over returning home in Myanmar, the displaced Rohingya people have no choice but to rely upon humanitarian aid. For them, every new day in the refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar is another day of struggle for survival.

While the exodus affected the entire displaced population, the plight of children, women and adults with disabilities is the worst since they faced barriers to access relief and meet specific needs. It is estimated that 44% of the households in all camps have a disability or a serious medical condition. Chronic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among the displaced people is still prevalent across the camps, affecting the entire population. All of these suggests that there is an urgent need for sustaining and continuing health services across all subsectors with a focus on primary health care and rehabilitation.
2REACH, UNHCR, Multi-Sector Needs Assessment: Cox’s Bazar, Rohingya Refugee Response – July 2018

HOW WE ARE HELPING

The first outcome of the nine-month activity is to resource the CBM-CDD health centre in Camp 18 to provide general healthcare, psychosocial care and rehabilitation services. In the health camp, a team comprised of doctors, paramedics and nurses, provide medical consultations, prescribe and distribute medicines and refer patients to specialised service providers, when required. The rehabilitation service team includes a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, audiometric technician, refractionist and volunteers provide a wide range of rehabilitative care, including provision of assistive devices, prosthetic limbs and therapies. The camp also has a section equipped with a psychosocial specialist and volunteers offering both individual and group counselling sessions. 5,000 Rohingya people are targeted to benefit from the centre-based services in this activity.

The second outcome is to support the Age and Disability Task Force (ADTF) set up to provide a coordinated approach to mainstreaming age and disability inclusion in the Rohingya response. CBM/CDD have actively engaged in disability mainstreaming since the beginning of interventions in Cox’s Bazar, working with different clusters and coordination committees to promote disability inclusion. This strategy is an important piece for the sustainability of the efforts to support older persons and persons with disabilities in the Rohingya crisis in Cox’s Bazar, that are estimated to be 90,991 persons approximately. The mainstreaming work aims to ensure that Rohingya people and host communities with disabilities, both contribute to and benefit from humanitarian programmes so that no one is left behind and all have opportunities to meet their needs in Cox Bazar.

The main objective is to:

  • Resource the CBM-CDD health centre in Camp 18 to provide general healthcare, psychosocial care and rehabilitation services.

Secondary objectives are to:

  • Support the Age and Disability Task Force (ADTF) set up to provide a coordinated approach to mainstreaming age and disability inclusion.
  • Ensure that Rohingya people and host communities with disabilities, both contribute to and benefit from humanitarian programmes.

Merina

WHEN A LANDMINE EXPLODED UNDER SALEHA, SHE THOUGHT HER LIFE WAS OVER

Saleha’s story is incredible. Strangers risked death to save her. They rushed back across the border to carry her from a minefield but now they cannot afford the basics of life, health or rehabilitation.

Read Saleha's story